Field Trips

Virtual Programming at Duke Homestead

Due to current health and safety concerns, we are unable to offer our normal hands-on programming for field trips. Below are virtual programs that can be done via webcam (through Google Classrooms). There is a limit of 95 participating students/teachers.

Our elementary field trips will last 35-45 minutes, and our middle and high school field trips will last for 40-50 minutes. These programs can be scheduled for anytime 9:30am to 3:30pm, Tuesday to Friday.

If you are interested in bringing your students in person, we can arrange for a guided tour. Please call or email to discuss this option.

Work and Play: LIfe on a 19th Century Farm 

Kindergarten-5th grade

What was life like in the mid 19th century for children? Most children worked hard on farms or in factories, but also had time to play. In this virtual program, students will critical thinking skills to compare and contrast daily life and work expectations between the past and present, and between rural and urban life. The virtual program will be led digitally by a member of the Duke Homestead staff. Staff will also lead a virtual object investigation to learn more about 19th century material culture.  

Tobacco Factories and Durham 

6th-8th grade, AmHis1, AmHis2

In this virtual program, students will learn about the history of tobacco as it relates to North Carolina. Led digitally by a member of the Duke Homestead staff, students will learn about the unique conditions that allowed North Carolina to become a stronghold for the tobacco industry in the United States, led by the Duke Family. They will learn about how the tobacco industry brought about and adapted to new technologies, how those new technologies effected workers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and how they perpetuated racial disparities. The virtual program will be led digitally by a member of the Duke Homestead staff. Staff will also facilitate activities investigating primary source documents, and an activity comparing, contrasting, and creating labor laws in North Carolina.

Exploring Artifacts at Duke Homestead

2nd-6th grade

While the Duke Family left many records, they did not write down all the details of their everyday lives while living at Duke Homestead from the 1850s-1870s. In this virtual program, students learn the importance in uncovering the lives of people who did not or could not leave written records. By looking at archaeology and artifacts, students will investigate and use critical thinking skills to learn about what objects can teach us about the people who lived in the past. The virtual program will be led digitally by a member of the Duke Homestead staff. Staff will lead virtual object investigations about items found on site at Duke Homestead to learn more about 19th century material culture. 

North Carolina Labor History Through Tobacco

6th-8th grade, AmHis1, AmHis2

North Carolina‚Äôs labor history has long been connected to tobacco. In this virtual program, a member of the Duke Homestead staff will lead students through the history of tobacco labor in North Carolina. In the program students and staff will discuss how the tobacco industry effected North Carolinians in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this program, students will learn about how the tobacco industry changed and shaped North Carolina and will learn how the demand for tobacco helped perpetuate institutions of slavery, sharecropping, and factory labor. Staff will virtually facilitate activities investigating primary source documents in this program.

To schedule a Field Trip:

Call: (919) 627-6990 between 9 am. and 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday

Or Email: duke@ncdcr.gov with field trip reservation requests

Or Fill Out and Submit the Field Trip Request Form

Please call at least two weeks in advance of the desired field trip date.

There is a fee of $30 per group of up to 95 participating students.

Duke Homestead also offers Guided Tours year round for all ages.

During this hour and a half visit, students will view the 17-minute orientation film, Legacy of the Golden Leaf, then tour the 1852 Duke home and historic area. Groups may wish to spend time exploring the museum after the tour or reserve the picnic area for lunch. Limit of three classes or 75 students per day.